JEvents Calendar

December 2018
M T W T F S S
26 27 28 29 30 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 1 2 3 4 5 6

JEvents Latest Events

No events
Native holly
Native holly

Nosworthy Park Details and History

Nosworthy Park is large, featuring different areas (open flat grassed park, spring-fed gully, dry slope and creek-bank), and environments (riparian, dry sclerophyll, rainforest) on the bank of Oxley Creek in Corinda.   The area has had a varied past,  being at one time cleared for farmland, then later the grassed hill slope was mown and used as a slide by local youngsters.  In the early 1990s much of the sloping area was revegetated with trees indigenous to the area and workers in an employment scheme constructed a walking track which loops down the hill and along the creek bank returning to the top via an area of open grassland.

The bushcare group formed in 2004 with the aim of revegetating a very disturbed and eroded site.  Some large Melaleuca bracteata trees, now probably close to 100 years old had survived the farm and sewerage clearing and the group has focussed on removal of weed and invasive vine species, erosion management, fostering natural regeneration where possible and planting to restore habitat.

Because the park is opposite Oxley Creek Common there is interchange of some bird species and regular bird surveys have been conducted here for many years now which provides valuable data on bird movements in the area.    The group is therefore designing planting to provide food sources and suitable habitat to further the options available for birds along the creek.

The group successfully obtained Commonwealth Water Grant funding in 2006 to address a significant erosion problem caused by storm water runoff.  The Brisbane City Council assisted with engineering and rock placement to manage velocity of runoff.

The site contains a remnant species, Gossia gonoclada, which attracts interest and scientific study.  A number of cuttings were successfully struck and planted around the site and are now several metres high.

The park has a shelter shed, toilet and town water as well as rain-water tanks for watering.

When do we meet?

Our working bees are held on the first Saturday of the month at 7.30 am in summer and 8.30am in winter.  The group works for about two hours followed by a pleasant morning tea and opportunity to chat.

 Where do we meet?

We meet at the shelter shed in the park (UBD 198 Q2) and then move to the spot chosen for the morning’s work.  Parking is available in the bays at the end of Donaldson Street, Corinda.  An email notice is sent out prior to the working bee.

 What do I need to bring?

Tools and gloves are provided, but bring your own if you have favourite gloves and digging tools.  Wear covered-up clothes, closed shoes, and hat and sunscreen and insect repellent as required.  Bring bottled drinking water to take with you when working.   Morning tea is provided.

Contact

 The Nosworthy Park Bushcare Group meets on the morning of the first Saturday of each month.  For further information please call the coordinator, Marie Hollingworth on 3278 2229 or 0408 465 591.  Better still, send her an email.

Latest News

Our Latest News

 

Global warmingDetails of our end of year celebrations are::

When - Sunday 2 December 2018 8.30 to 11.30am

Where - Pooh Corner

RSVP to Shealagh This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

 


Save the trees from deer damage with knitted tree protectors !

 Feral deer often strip the bark off native trees in urban bushland and also off street trees around Brisbane. 

Jindalee Bushcare Group, which restores large areas of the Mount Ommaney Bushland Reserve, is putting
knitted protectors around trees whose trunks have been partially stripped by feeding deer. This is to
prevent further damage to the trees and to save them from being completely ringbarked which would kill
them. So far, this experiment has been successful!
There are so many affected trees, that the group would  appreciate some help in knitting the protectors.
Get out your yarn left over from knitting winter  and start knitting! Or you can crochet…

  pdf For further information and to download the simple knitting pattern, please click here. (852 KB)